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. >> japan's prime minister wastes no time on calling on the bank of japan to recognize support after a land slide win returning the dlp to power. >>> get a little, give a little, house speaker john boehner may be willing to raise taxes on the wealthy if president obama allows entitlement cuts in return. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, p
avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it's a five-month high. the manufacturing pmi, 46.1. the manufacturing all told, 46.3. that's a bit under the poll of 46.6. with more on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it appears ta stronger services may be weaker on the manufacturing relative to expectations, at least, b
seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washington po " post's" claim that the senate would be better with more women. i'm not done debating that. more coming up on this program today. and we want to hear from you as well. send your e-mails to and we read them on the air. and we read all of them, by the way. i've got news, clearwire selling itself to sprint for $2.97 a share and sprint raised its offer by 7 cents. some clearwire shareholders wanted and expected more. that stock is down. sprint is up, it's getting what people consider a good deal, at least that's what the market is saying. it's up what, 4 cents, not much. aig selling the re
1960 onwards, the united states of america recycle 70% of its surpluses to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small part of it. i will not bore you with details. but it was not an act of philanthropy. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how
. >>> and japan's finance minister is saying other companies have no right to lecture japan on its currency policy instead calling for the u.s. to seek a strong dollar. >>> okay. welcome back to "worldwide exchange" this morning. let's take a quick check on trade as we close out the last full trading week of the year. not even a full week, but just one of the last trading weeks of the year. >> monday seems so far away. >> it's just kind of sticking out there, the 24th and 31st. european markets were closed for boxing day week. got back into trade yesterday. sort of a mixed bag across the board. u.s. markets were weaker and this morning europe is following the u.s. down that path. the ftse just a little bit lower. the xetra dax down by .1%. the cac 40 which was one of the strong performers yesterday giving up some of its gains. the ibex 35 underperforming. >> the penny stock not worth a whole lot so you have to take that into consideration. but yeah, drifting lower on the bond markets. today we have this italian debt auction which would be interesting. we've got rome offering somewhere in 2 to 3 bi
between the kurds centers on land and oil rights. now to japan where the prime minister designate is taking a tough line after his victory at the polls saying there can be no compromise over the island is at the center of dispute with china. china has reacted with alarm. beijing declared itself "ready to work with japan" and they expressed disquiet. >> the former prime minister vowed to put the japanese economy back on track after years of deflation made worse by a soaring currency that has squeezed japanese exporters. >> a landslide victory for the conservative ldp party. voters are putting their trust in his promise to get the economy back on track. >> the mission we have been given is to beat inflation and deal with the high yen and wall dealing with the economy and working to create more jobs. >> many voters were critical over the handling of the devastating earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. they say it was last eight support rather than a rejection of the outgoing premier. >> politics is all about the results. we have to take responsibility. the cause of this major d
totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churned out a liberty ship in a record four and a half days. that's faster than most of my students can write one of their semester papers. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technol
. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's detailed plan on urban development. strengthening main line blue chips pushed the hang seng to a 16-month high. developers, industrials, and gaming stocks among the top gamers today. >>> in japan the country's october machinery orders not rebounding as strongly as expected. investors were still in the buying mood ahead of this sunday's election. the nikkei ended near an eight-month closing high with exporters rallying on the weaker yen. south korea's kospi gained ground despite north korea's rocket launch. au
.3 earthquake strikes japan's northeast coast. tsunami warnings have been issued. job growth in the u.s. are expected to have slowed significantly in november as hurricane sandy battered the economy. and euro hits a session low, 0.4% as problems in europe's periphery continue to weigh. a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake has struck across japan's northeastern coast. the quake rocked buildings as far as tokyo according to reports. u.s. geological survey said there was no threat in the wider pacific ocean. the yen has been rising to a session high before we got details of that. and right now, you can see dollar-yen at 82.39. 82.17 before that happened. some safe haven in-flows into japanese currency. if there was going to be a wave in terms of tsunami that was going to hit, it would have happened around five, six minutes ago and she had yet to see any specific drop or change in the sea level. so we'll hope that that continues on that particular way. atomic power says no irregularities seen at its nuclear plant. operations are normal after the quake. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and w
at this headline. a land without guns. how japan has virtually eliminated shootings. in part by forbidding almost all forms of firearm ownership japan has as few as two gun-related homicides a year. i understand -- oh, we can't do that here! >> there are too many guns out to there to confiscate. >> stephanie: a friend of mine said bad people are always going to get -- [ buzzer ] where are the guns in japan? >> every country has bad people. every country has sociopaths. every country has people that want to kill other people. >> stephanie: the president's right. we can't tolerate we have more freedom. really? this is the price of freedom? how many zillion times more than the next country? >> kids get killed in elementary school? >> stephanie: in first grade. >> gun people have their rights so that kids can have their rights and lives taken away. >> stephanie: i'm just saying -- i'm not saying we're going to ban all guns like japan but do you think there's some connection that there's two deaths a year in japan from guns.
. >> you like japan, yes or no. >> i love japan. >> i like cliff naturals i like the least because of the debt. >> summed it. charles you better deliver on the picks. happy new year . david asbin and forbes on fox is here right now. >> just about everybody is trying to stop the tax cuts from expiring. but billions in subidies for wind energy should be expiring. could they be right or will they blow up energy prices. we'll go in focus with steve bor bes and bill and morgan. is it paying off? >> no, it is 18 times that of nuclear energy. ronald reagan was right. thest thing to immortality is a government program. politicians are labeled with hot wind and we label the section gone with the wind. >> we have sending sib sidies in '92, has it been worth it. >> we are early inlet process. we have subsidized oil and coal and gas. we have done them from darn near a century. these don't look so bad. like it or not, the majority of americans believe that global warming is an issue. we need to develop clear energy sources. fossil fuels may be a difficult problem. we are subsidizing thingings.
the dollar and the euro ir, as well. priced in a lot in terms of monetary policy out of japan. and aussie dollar, 1.0463, yes, we have cut the cash rate in australia to match the record low of 3%. but we see the aussie dollar rise because it's pretty much all priced in. sterling-dollar also getting a benefit. back over 1.61. so that's where we stand in european trade. let's recap the asian trading session for the first time today, when you not the last. >> thank you, ross.not the last. >> thank you, ross. shanghai composite recovered from its four year low as property financials, rebounded. shale gas and geothermal plays also rallied as beijing plans to cut its annual coal consumption target by 2015. the hang seng finished m eed marginally in the green. losses in the services sector capped the up side. in japan, down beat manufacturing data spurred profit taking on exporters, but sharp shares gained on a deal with qualcomm. more on that coming up from tokyo. south korea kospi also lost a quarter of a percent today. heavy weight cost company underperformed as investors fear the possible bi
commodity. it could be exchanged for silk in india and the silk exchanged for swords in japan, and those swords would be sold back in england and the whole thing would start again. so the ex-peasant who is now running the show on a small plot of land handed over to him by the landlord would be an entrepreneur. effectively, he borrowed money from the landlord in order to pay for three things. rent of the land, wages in the form of corn, to the ex- peasants who are now wandering in the countryside knocking on doors because they don't have direct access to land, and some machinery, shears for clipping wool. so land, labor, and capital could be purchased in advance of production, on the basis that the entrepreneur, ex- peasant has to the landlord. -- on the basis of the debt that the entrepreneur, ex-peasant house to the landlord. so debt comes first, then comes distribution of income in the form of a labor contract. it will work for so many hours and i will give you so much corn. then comes production. it was a combination of this reversal of the order from having production followed by a d
to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into where we are with this global market. more now on the global trading day in europe. 5-4 advances just about outpace decliners on the dow jones stoxx 600. most european stocks were up yesterday. the dax up 13 points. the dax, second highest close of the year, still up 27.5% for the year. right now, the ftse sound, the cac kron, closed at a fresh 52-week high. and the ftse is up 13 points despite falls from italian banks. let's show you where we are as far as the bond yields are concerned. we just check in. italian yields, 4.4% on the year. we'll show you the twos and tens, as well. i'll give you more on how that compares to where we closed yesterday. so the two-year, that's the low where we were yesterday. 10-year spanish yields, 5.581%. two-year yield, 2.35%, kind of where we were yesterday, too. and they're continue to go appreciateslide slightly from yesterday's close. as far as currency markets, 1.2880 was the two-week low on
. >>> and japan's nikkei 225 reaches the 10,000 mark for the first time in eight months. stocks rally after a widening trade deficit softens the yen and heightens expectations for more stimulus. >>> we are expecting to get the latest results from germany's survey any second now. in the meantime, i can can bring you news. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect t
that a budget deal is closer. in asia, japan's nikkei rising above the 10,000 mark, wow, the first time in more than eight months. still a ways from 50,000. among the catalysts, expectations of more aggressive monetary stimulus from the bank of japan. the boj wraps up a two-day meeting with a policy announcement tomorrow. >>> the world bank in the meantime is raising its 2013 economic growth forecast for china and for developing east asia. the organization says that the region remains resilient despite the lackluster performance of the global economy. the world bank sees china expanding by 8.4% next year. it's expecting that it will be fueled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. today's forecast is higher than an earlier one that was sited in a world bank report in october. 8.4%, not bad both if you can get it. >>> speaking of china, the united states is moving forward with plans to slap steep anti-dumping duties on wind turbine towers that are imported from china at prices that are deemed unfairly low. the news from the commerce department comes as u.s
an example from mexico. >> first, some of the stories making news. japan has a new prime minister, voted in by the lower house of parliament earlier today. his liberal democratic party won by a landslide in polls earlier this month. he has vowed to introduce aggressive monetary policies and says he wants to revise japan's pacifist constitution. >> china has launched the world's longest high-speed rail route. the line between cities is almost 2,900 kilometers long. trains travel an average speed of 300 kilometers per hour, cutting travel time in half to just eight hours. >> floods in malaysia have forced more than 13,000 people to flee their homes. the floods have hit several states of the country's east coast. one woman died after slipping into a swollen river, and forecasters are expecting more rain to fall. >> china's leading producer of rare earth is attempting to shut down some plants in an attempt to stem falling prices. the group will keep some mines and factories closed until the end of january. >> rare earths are crucial in making a broad range of high- tech products. prices have
more competitive. meanwhile, the bank of japan was debating measures to -- joining us now, allen capper is with us around this table. when we talk about the yen, how important is this weakness? and do you expect this trade to be for 2013? >> i think this is probably the single most important thing the europeans ought to be watching. it's clear that the change in japanese policy, if by the time we get to q4 next year, you will see stronger japanese numbers, there would be a stronger temptation to carry out much more massive qe and fiscal stimulus. it's too early to say, but i think we need to watch japan carefully. >> currency wars is what ur use saying. >> absolutely. and i like his idea about fiscal stimulus through official use of the funds. it's a very interesting strategy. >> ur r it seems to me the next level of this is you have to bloef the government can achieve this. how are they going to be able to shake off inflation? >> the key look is to acknowledge that inflation is not the problem. when you talk to investors good qe, they're concerned about the inflationary impact. my mind
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
on with the japanese elections? the new prime minister told the bank of japan we want more stimulus. guess who's meeting thursday? the bank of japan. japan's exports fall for the sixth straight month. you are going to see the bank of japan on thursday announce new stimulus measures. you're going to see efforts to weaken the yen. it's going to get even weaker. that is the old yen carry trade. that may be where some of this money is coming from to do the odd little trades that seem to be going on. out of bonds, into stocks, selling gold as well. i think that's a real factor here. what caught my eye this morning, there was a survey out saying the hedge funds is the most exposed to the market since 2010. a lot of people mentioned that and said, that is a contrary indicator, high levels of activity in the stock market for hedge funds, often a negative indicator overall. let me mention night capital. they are selling themselves to geico. i took two-to-one ratio. this is a good deal all around. you're going to marry the biggest, fastest traders out there, getco. you're going to marry that with knight
the sazian session? only one lady to tell us. >> thank you, ross. asian markets ended mix. japan's bourses outperformed the region. despite a slight improvement in november corporate sentiment showed weakness. knee sap finished lower as they planned to recall nearly 50,000 cars in japan. shanghai composite pulled back after yesterday's 3% surge. investors booked profit. property developments seemed to have legs. the hang sent also ended marginally in the red. hsbc came under pressure after reports say it may pay a $1.8 billion fine over the money dering scandal. in australia, strong jobs data failed to boost the market. the asx 200 finished lower by a quarter percent. sensex still in action now trading lower by 0.4%. back to you. >> all right. catch you later. apple had its worst day in four years dragging down the nasdaq. different story for the dow. at one point dow was up more than 100 points. the last time the index closed up triple dinlg et gains, the way back in may two 2. joining us for the first part of the program, nick khar. thanks for joining us. xetra dax up 52 week highs. whic
is not doing that well. not to talk about japan. so this has a slowdown effect which reverb rates on the growth of emerging countries. >> and i know when you see what's happening in italy, will this, the political developments in italy that cause more instability and less reform there, are you concerned that will have a further destabilization impact? >> no. i mean, i think it comes at a time where we are starting to see an exit, a crisis exist by europe. whether this will stabilize, i hope not. i mean, i think the italians are reasonably rationale. and they know what monti brought to them in terms of reducing the italian overprice on the market. and that's -- you know, that's big money. so it comes at the moment where, you know, europe was probably start to go exit the crisis. unfortunate, but the euro system i think now is stronger than it was a year ago. >> and we've seen a lot of change in the u.s. election as well as talk about whoever won whether there would be increased trade tension wes china.. we heard from tim cook last week and he was asked what would it take to make more products in
to japan, voters are heading to the poll on sunday. the major indicators suggest a win for the opposition party. the local media says there is still a large pool of undecided japanese voters. kari enjoji has more on this report from tokyo. >> reporter: 12 parties, some less than a month ole are fielding 1,504 candidates. but instead of being slow for choice, voters say i just don't know. polls suggest the prime minister's democratic party is unraveling, hinting that many first-time politicians that swept the party to a victory three years ago could be wiped out. >> it's quite possible that the cpj will sink from neing first or second but possibly to even third parties in japanese politics. >> the dpj's handling of the fukushima disaster and undelivered economic promises have alien ated many voters. if the liberal democratic party wins, shinzo abi could with the newest restoration governor. the emergence of these smaller parties could mean a messy transition period. >> my gut feeling is that possibly no single party will win the single majority in the next election. this is democracy. even
of all that, true. >> not such a crummy year for japan. japanese stocks rallying you can the yen continuing its slide against the dollar in all the major currencies, in fact. asian markets mixed overnight trading. the nikkei climbing to a closing level not seen since just before the march 2011 earthquake, marking a third day of gains, mostly drive bine hopes for a new stimulus policy. the yen is sitting closes to the lowest level since september 2010 against the dollar. interesting here because now a lot of people are saying the best or the hottest trade in 2013 will, in fact, be long japanese stocks and short the yen because what's different this time around, now there is an actual target, 90 is the target. we know where it is going to go. if they are able to weaken the yen to that point, it is a core roll lary stocks will go higher, exactly what happened with the united states, ben bernanke ease he can the monetary policy and the 14% gain in the stock market this year. >> seen the yen basically strangling japanese exports for so long. >> exactly. >> so you know, obviously i the
's threatened by this. such a missile could reach alaska, hawaii, south korea or japan. that's one of the reasons that all of those countries have taken precautionary measures, the u.s. sending four warships to the region, south korea has a warship observing all the events. japan activating its anti-missile shield. the plan launched in provocation in direct defines of the security council. the state department said we have the un security council statement which strongly condemned their last launch and made clear that the council was determined to take action if there is a further launch and we stand by that, end quote. just what action the un might take remains unclear but the tightening of sanctions is almost a sure bet and given that much of the technology for north korea's missile program is imported, a stricter ban of technology sports from around the world may be in the offing. >> shepard: technical problems is the reason given for the delay. it sounds like a lot of analysts believe that could be a cover. >> reporter: that's what couple of south korean analysts are telling th
or medicine, physics, chemistry, and economics went to eight winners from the u.s., japan, france, and britain. >> the nobel prize for economics was jointly awarded to allan ross and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand -- alvin roth and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand. 89-year-old lloyd shapley, professor emeritus at the university of california, received a standing ovation. >> while the eu is celebrating winning the nobel peace prize, one of its largest member states has been plunged into crisis. >> first data appeared that italy was facing the prospect -- first, it appeared that italy was facing the prospect of uncertainty as mario monti appeared to be on the prospect of resigning. that pushed the stock market into a downward slide. >> in the last couple of hours, prime minister mario monti has come out and said he is not planning to step down in the near future after all, and that the nervous reaction in the markets should not be dramatized. >> investors are already nervous about what mario monti's early departure could spell for the eurozon
, japan and south korea, as well as the u.s., believe it was a disguised as for long-range missiles -- disguised test for long-range missiles. >> president obama announced the u.s. would formally recognize the coalition of syrian opposition groups. >> that endorsement came as the friends of syria group met in morocco to discuss ways of ending the conflict. >> this internet footage purports to show the aftermath of explosions on the outskirts of the syrian capital of damascus. two other explosions were reported targeting the interior ministry and the justice ministry. state-run television reported at least one death and several injuries in what it called terrorist attacks. as the violence continued on the ground, diplomacy continued elsewhere. representatives of 130 countries met with opposition figures in morocco. the so-called friends of syria group recognized the opposition as the legitimate representative of the syrian people. following the lead of the eel and the u.s. -- of the eu and the u.s. >> this is an important step. we think it is important the national coalition continue
's oil fields direct access to key markets in japan, south korea, taiwan, the philippines, and the usa. >> after six years of construction and around 21 billion euros, the pipeline is complete. russia hopes it will be able to expand sales into the u.s. market. it also wants to sell more into southeast asia. the pipeline goes 2,700 kilometers. oil has been flowing from there to china since 2010. now, the final section has been completed. from there, it can be shipped out. until now, the oil was transported along this last leg by train. that had a limited capacity of 15 million barrels of oil per year. the new pipeline can carry three times that amount. it is part of russia's plan to reduce its reliance on europe, which currently buys about 87% of the country's oil exports. during price talks with europe, russia has also -- often said it would seek other buyers and focus more on asian buyers. >> china's biggest producer of so-called rare earths has suspended output at some of its plants for another month as part of an effort to push up prices. >> rare earths are a group of elements cruci
will be the last and full trading day of the year. in asia, japan and south korean markets are closed. the rest of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading s
for swords in japan, and those swords would be sold back in england and the whole thing would start again. so the ex-peasant who is now running the show on a small plot of land handed over to him by the landlord would be an entrepreneur. effectively, he borrowed money from the landlord in order to pay for things, and pitiful wages in the form of corn, to the ex-peasants who are now wandering in the countryside knocking on doors because they don't have direct access to land. and some machinery -- shears for clipping wool. so land, labor, and capital, could be purchased in advance of production, on the basis that the entrepreneur, ex-peasant has to the landlord. so debt comes first, then comes distribution of income in the form of a labor contract. it will work for so many hours and i will give you so much corn. it was a combination of this reversal of the order from having production followed by a distribution, followed by debt, to having debt first, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capital
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of the world's highest profile whistle blowers. michael woodford was president and ceo of japan's olympus corporation. his dream job turned in to a nightmare when he discovered the company had hidden more than $1 million in investment losses. he has a new book out called exposure. you had been at the company for a while but you were not the president and ceo. >> i'd been with the company for three decades. but became president on the first of april and was fired as president and ceo on the 14th of october. so 6 1/2 months. >> was it the previous ceo that orchestrated this? >> yes, he's admitted his guilt. >> and chairman was in cahoots? >> the former chairman and ceo became president. >> were you chairman, as well? >> no i wasn't. i was president and ceo. he remained chairman. he was known by many as the dr. evil character. and if you see his face, he looks like dr. evil and he was evil. >> it's hard to imagine. this is kind of a stunning story. just the idea that you could cover p broad losses. your problem was you looked and you saw the acquisitions that looked like ridiculous deals. ad
, a tunnel collapse west of tokyo raising safety questions right across japan. we're going take a look at the cave-in that left cars mangled and drivers dead. everything has to be just right. perfection is inthe details. ♪ get to holiday fun faster with pillsbury cookie dough. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enr
is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the newspapers, you feel like what else can he say? it's not going to be a day where you'll buy sterling aggressively because most of the news is going to be bad. we're going to have lower growth. potentially missing at least the underlying fiscal targets and rules. so it's not a great day for sterling. i think the bigger impact will be if the rating agencies get twitchy. then i think sterling will be a bit more vulnerable. but i don't think it's necessarily a story for this afternoon. >> we saw manufacturing came in slightly better than expect. so there risk to the upside from the pmi? >> maybe. it doesn't feel like pmis are really getting a grip on the market. we're not in a world where interest rates are going an
to find ways to not be dependent. have a nephew thinking -- teaching english in japan and staying there into the job market is better here. >> this comes back, we have moved off of the question of the economy. among other things when people say can we afford to spend to boost the economy, the costs of not doing that are among others things a lost generation of young people. a terrible job market, people are coming out of school or college or private school into a market that has no use for them. they never get that first job that makes use of your potential, never get started on the latter. we will be paying a price for our inaction in the face of mass unemployment for years because of what we're doing. >> absolutely right. particularly foolish right now, u.s. government can borrow at negative real interest rate. >> the u.s. government sells bonds that are protected against inflation and will not devalue and the interest rate on ten year inflation bonds at minus 0.8%. people hate government taking their money. >> once you recognize that and recognize we have higher return investme
. >> normally is different because of oil. >> i think sweden and germany -- >> in japan. i'd be careful about drawing too much for japan. i think that sweden, denmark and germany are really interesting and what they've done with the deal between labor and capital and also frankly across society. the german reaction to the recession was sensitive laypeople of, everybody would effectively take a pay cut of 30%. it takes a lot of social unity to have that. having said that, i think it's going to take more than going to the social democracy of northern europe because you're feeling tensions also in northern european countries and you'd be surprised at the extent to which this whole discourse we are having could have the same discussion in berlin and particularly in berlin but the germans are realizing this in a way they didn't hollow at the middle class. they did the rest of your. they are the china of the e.u. that's one way to do it. the only other thing i might say, which is funny and the reaction i liked in my book, senior european goldman sachs guy who i quoted my book sent me an e-mail sayi
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on that project, the making of a global capitalism and then even as it helps europe and japan revive, the question is, how does is keep reducing? because now you're creating your own competitors. >> at one point in your book to speak but the american empire, actually dramatic appoints. tucker added as imperialism by invitation. you want to talk to the lead of such a mean by that. >> it's actually a phrase that a sweet story and used for 1945. but it is largely not -- it's a matter of saying that the pentagon in the cna have, in fact, not been essential to the role the american state has played in the world as the treasury and the federal reserve have been. and that term empire which was coined for the way in which decapolis class of europe after 1945 facing strongly and much more concerning labour movements , the socialist threat that they posed, and they were concerned about a soviet invasion. turn to the american state to look to the american state to reconstruct a capitalistic. and in that sense it was empire building. when multinational corporations, the conditions by the late 1950's were foun
, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why
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